Friday, February 15, 2019
At the invitation of Free Press Unlimited and the Stanley Foundation, fifteen journalists from all corners of the world are coming together in The Netherlands for a week, starting 18th February. They work in areas where climate change is already being felt and report on the problems closely linked with that. During the week, they will share journalistic solutions and knowledge about the connection between climate, water and conflict.

The invited journalists are from Mali, Iraq, Egypt, Nigeria, Cameroon, Pakistan, Jamaica and Haiti, countries where a free press is not always self-evident. They know better than anyone what is going on in their region: war, failed harvests, large-scale floods, population migration, water shortages and disease. They also report on local measures to tackle these, and are therefore both journalist and expert.
https://www.freepressunlimited.org/nl/projecten/fellowship-voor-klimaatverslaggeving-met-impact

Journalism and climate change

On Tuesday 19th February, the group in The Hague are participating in the Planetary Security Conference 2019, in a session on journalism and climate change. This session will be moderated by photo journalist Ricci Shryock (The New Yorker, Vogue, De Spiegel, Buzzfeed) and Peter Schwarzstein (National Geographic, Foreign Policy, Newsweek, BBC), with speakers Said Nazir (Tribal News Network, Pakistan) and Mame Diarra Diop (UN radio Mikado FM, Mali).     https://www.planetarysecurityinitiative.org/activity/s5-reporting-climate-and-security-challenges-and-innovations-local-storytelling

Reporting with impact

During the week, Free Press Unlimited and the Stanley Foundation are organizing further training for the journalists. Led by experienced climate journalists, Ricci Shryock and Khaled Suleiman, they will investigate how to report with impact on climate change. The journalists can return to their own countries with new knowledge and skills to more effectively reach the highest policy levels with their storytelling. In that way, they can improve the quality they deliver to their audience and help limit the consequences of climate change.

The journalists

The journalists are: Alhousseini Alhadji (Radio JAMANA Tombouctou, Mali), Borzou Daragahi (The Independent, Turkey), Rahma Diaa, (freelance, Egypte), Mame Diarra Diop (UN Radio/ Mikado FM, Mali), Jean Phares Jerome (Le Nouvelliste, Haiti), Tosin Kolade (NAN, Nigeria), Sory Kondo (Sahelien.com, Mali), Florence Massena (freelance, Norway), Younes Mohammad (Metrography, Iraq), Said Nazir (Tribal News Network, Pakistan), Elias Ntungwe Ngalame (PAMACC, Cameroon), Zainab Rushdi Almashat, (AlMada Group, Iraq), Dia Sacko (Mali Culture,  Mali), Christopher Serju (The Gleaner, Jamaica), Niyaz Abdulla Kader (Radio Nawa, Iraq).